4 hazelwood court howell nj free. 8 Hazelwood Ct, Howell, NJ 07731

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Favorite this property Click the heart icon to add this property to your favorites list Save Search View Map. Loading Image. West Bend , WI Based on a 30 year fixed loan at 4. Mortgage Calculator. Emery Beal, Charles P. Bush and Orman Holmes constituted the board. The County Commissioners ceased to have authority after the Legislature of and the board of supervisors was reorganized. It has met regularly ever since that time. Judge Kingsley S.

Bingham the first Probate Judge of this county, had no official business to perform. His office was at his residence in Green Oak. The next, Judge James W. Stanbury, lived in Pinckney and held his court there. The first will he admitted to probate was that of James Sage, the first white settler of Howell, who died June 29, His will was dated January 15 of that year and was officially witnessed by Dr.

Wellington A. Glover and wife and 0. Sage’s son-in-law, Joseph H. The legatees were Mrs. Sage widow of the deceased, and her children, George T. Sage, James R. Sage, Chester A. Sage, Mary A. Pinckney and Hannah A. The date of record is quite badly faded but it was sometime in July, Kneeland who was elected in , moved the office to Howell.

His first business was on February 8, , when letters of administration were granted in the estate of Josiah P. The Presbyterian society held most of its meetings in the village school house, as did both the other denominations, until the year , In the society began the erection of a church building which was completed the following year. This church originally stood a little north of the Central School Hous square and fronted to the south, amidst what was then a growth of underbrush.

The site proved to be a bad one as in muddy weather, the church was almost inaccessible, and it was moved to nearly the present site of the Knapp shops. Sometime afterward the society became involved by too extensive repairs to the building and it was sold at forced sale, to the highest bidder. It was afterwards moved to Division street and occupied by Staley’s wagon shop for a good many years. Its old ruins, about twenty feet from the first school house, still remain.

When the church was first organized it adopted the union plan but on September 21, , by resolution it became Presbyterian and remained so until July 29, when it changed to Congregational, but returned to Presbyterian October 27, and has been in that connection since that date.

As before referred to there was a determined effort made to move the county site to Brighton and the. B Crane and others. This agitation however had the effect to defeat all projects to build sutiable buildings when presented to the people as heretofore detailed in these pages. The earliest officers who had office in Howell, all made their offices at the Eagle Tavern. Crane built a one story building of two rooms near the site of Mrs. Amos T. Slader’s present residence, in and the county offices were soon moved to it, the building being rented by the county.

It was aftcrwards purchased as will be noted further on. In , the board of supervisors contracted with Benjamin Spring, for the use of his ball room in his hotel in which to hold conrt. This arrangement only lasted for a slort time and the Presbyterian church was leased for holding court and all coun-ty tumeetings. The Tental was twenty five dollars per teram of court for a time, and later, forty dollars per year, for all county purposes.

This latter arranguemennt continued for about three years, until what is now known as the old court house, was completed In the spring of , a vote was taken at each town moeting, to build a court house and jail, and the board of Supervisors elected a building committee who advertised for the recieval of plans and spe-ifications.

By the time the board met in October of that year, they had taken legal counsel and decided that tl. In the following year the Legislature passed an enabling act and the board at a special meeting in June, , arralnged for the building of the old court house. After sonme delay, the contract was let to Emos B. Taylor whe completed the building late in the fall of By a resolution of the Board, the belfry was erected upon condition that the people of Howell should raise a suitable sum to purchase a bell.

When the old court house was torn down, the bell was saved by Fishbeck Brothers and others. It has since been properly mounted and stands just inside the bar railing in the circuit court room. When it came to building the court house, the location became an iniportant issue. No one had cared particularly where the commissioners should locate the county site except that it should be in Howell but when the buildings were to be commenced that was another question and especially so to Peter Cowdry and Edward Thompson who had platted additions to the village and were sure that if they could get the buildings located upon their land it would prove a boom to their additions.

After a proper effort they succeeded in so doing and the connty site was changed from the old public square south of Grand River street and west of Walnut street, to its present location, the front part of the present square being donated to the county by M. Cowdry and the north half by Mr. The lots of the origrinal portion of town had many of them been purchased by speculators who were non residents and this fact, with the moving of the county site, had much to do with changinz the.

With the procuring of the new site, the old county office building was moved to the new square in a position about midway between the present front of the court house and the west side of the square.

When the, brick office building was erected on that site it was moved to the north side of the square and was later sold to William B. Smith who moved it a block east, on the south side of Grand River street west of Bernard street, where it became part of the residence recently purchased by Oscar Hesse. It has been rebuilt several times. Immediately after the court house was finished the board of supervisors passed a resolution to allow all religious denominations to hold services there and the proposition was accepted by all but the Presbyterians who already had their chureh built.

The jail and sheriff’s residence occupied the ground floor of the old court house and the court and jury rooms the second story. In a contract was let to George W. Lee to build an office building west of the court house, on the site occupied by the wooden office building.

This building was completed that year and. Rubert’s lumber and coal yard is now located. About this time or a little before, the village acquired its first resident pastor. Henry Root who had been employed by the Presbyterian church, moved to Howell as its pioneer in that profession.

The people of this county were of a literary taste and in organized a Union Lyceum which became very popular in those early days. About this time the Fleming post office was established. Smith was its first postmaster and the office was located in his residence which stood nearly opposite to the present farm residence of Frank Hecox, on the Grand River road.

It was afterwards moved to six corners where it was maintained until some time after free rural delivery was established. The Marr buring ground was also established in the early ’40s. The old general training days were seasons of revelry more or less important from the first, but their amount in this county were of a comparatively small importance before , As far back as the days of Amos Adams there were some things accomplished in this line and that gentleman painted a flag for use on these occasions, which is still in existence, a treasured relic in the home of George W.

In a regiment was organized in this county with Col. Timothy R. Allison of Pinckney, in command. By an order dated Feb. The company from this beat was comparatively well organized with Ralph Fowler of Fowlerville, as captain. The troops were mustered in on old public square, but a portion of the forty sold to M. Crittenden soon after her husband’s death was prepared for training purposes.

The general poor success of trainings of this character, to secure the desired results, caused the repeal of the law soon after the above date and ended all extensive efforts of that character in Howell.

The early pioneers were patriots as strong as many who have come after them. The first Fourth of July celebration in this city was held under temperance auspices, in , in the grove where the Presbyterian church now stands. No attempt was made at fireworks or other evening demonstration. Manufacturing in a pioneer way, took quite a boom about this time.

Andrew L. Hill opened a wagon shop in Hill made the first cutter in town for Philander Glover. It was afterwards purchased by Judge Turner who located here in In W. K, Melvin and James Lawther opened the “Areade shops” and put up the building which years after, was built over into the Commercial Hotel. In , Hickey and Galloway erected a foundry on the site ofMrs, L.

Cook’s residence south of the tunnel. They not only manufactured all kinds of agricultural implements, but all kinds of stoves, kettles, etc. The shops were successively owned by. Archer and lastly by Abigal W. Smith and Dexter Filkins, They were burned while the latter gentlemen owned them. Marsh settled here in The shores of time in this vicinity are lined with wrecks of select schools and other private educational institutions. The earliest of these was by Theodore Bridgeman who opened his Howell Select School in , in the old Presbyterian church.

The school lived only a little while and died in time to make room for the Clasical Select School which was started in December of that year by Rev. McEwen, but this ent erprise soon kept company with its predecessor. M’ariah L. Charles was the next and her select school was quite an institution in the summer of The Howell Academy was opened April 1, , and premised to be quite an institution but the promises were never realized. Whipple, Elijah F. Lee, John Kenyon Jr.

This firm never did anything beyond the procurement of its charter. The old frame school house proved entirely inadequate for the growth of the town and early in the forties agitation for a new one began to grow. An appropriation for a new building was made in , but was reconsidered. A fight between sections north and south of Grand River street was fully developed. The north side was never strong enough to secure the location although they managed to secure south-siders enough to change every location decided upon from to , and kept the ball rolliDg from the old public square, the present site of the M.

Church, and others, until its final location on the present site of the central scoool building, December 15, The question of location would no doubt have continued much longer had not a resolution been passed in September, , instructing the district board to sell the school house which they did and rented rooms in the Stage House for school purposes, John Dickson being employed to teach there.

Willis Wills was tho first teacher in the new building, In , a dissolution arose in the Presbyterian church and Charles Clark, Mrs. Mariah Clark, Zebulon M. Drew, Edward F. Gay, Mrs. Clarssa L. Gay, Benjamine W. Cardell and wife drew out of that church and organized a Congregational church. The Bible society was organized in and did considerable work until A new society was organized in which has been allowed to lapse al. Pettibone Esq.

About this time the prevailing epidemic of fun making took a setback. The wife of a blacksmith named Rorabacher died. Her bereaved husband failed to wait a sufficient time after her funeral, to suit his neighbors ideas of propriety, before he married his second wife. One result of this condition of affairs was the arrangement for a regular old fashioned horning. The late Dr. Huntington who was always ready for fun was solicited to captain the horning party but he declined the honor and decided to present a counter attraction.

Accordingly he arranged with a couple of confederates and the three crawled up near Rorabacher’s house unobserved by its occupants who were all unconscions of what awaited them. In time the horning party arrived, led by Benjamin Spring who was literally covered with sleighbells. As he approached at the head of his crowd, the doctor and his party opened upon them with double barrelled shot guns.

Spring cut and run, nor would he go back. Some little noise was started however, but word came from the house that the bride 14ad been scared into hysterics and the doctor had a patient on his hands. It took very little coaxing to send the crowd away for the joke was so badly on Spring because of his scare, that everyone pulled him back to his hotel to liquor up at his expense. There were great tracts of land all around, which were unfenced and cattle were allowed to run at large during the days.

Occasionally one would come up missing and the theory usually was that it had wandered into some of the marshes and mired out of sight. Johnathan Austin lost a cow and after awhile, gave it up as lost.

Some months later a neighbor told him that he had seen his cow pasturing on the public square. Austin went to the square and finding a cow which looked Jike his, drove her home.

Then Z. M, Drew’s cow was reported lost. In time it was reported to Mr. Drew that Johnathan Austin had his cow and he went to claim it.

Both men were sure the cow was theirs and a law suit was the result. Both were leading members of the Presbyterian church and there was quite a little row kicked up in church circles over the matter.

The trial created no end of interest. Both sides presented leading citizens who positively identified the cow and everything looked like an even strength for both sides of the case. Shortly before time for adjournment for supper, Dr. Huntington who was one of the jurors casually asked witnesses on both sides as to the milking qualities. Austin’s witnesses agreed that his cow was a hard milker, while Drew’s witnesses testified that his cow was a very.

The case went to the jury in the evening and they returned a verdict in a few minutes, unanimous for Drew. During the intermission the doctor quietly went and milked the cow. As soon as they reached the jury room he told his companions what he had done.

The fact that she was an easy milker settled the case. In those early days however, it didn’t settle the row. Another case about that time will remain a standing joke of the county as long as the pioneers remain. A man had been arrested for stealing and was taken into Circuit Court where he stated that he had no money and Attorney Hawkins was appointed to defend him, 11r. He is said to have asked the fellow if he was guilty and was answered that he was. To his enquiry as to whether they could prove it his client said that he guessed that they could for they found the stolen property with him.

Hawkins asked him how much money he had and took half of it. He then pointed to a window and told the prisoner to “git. After awhile the sheriff hunted him up and told him the judge wanted to see him, Hawkins is said to have sauntered leisurely into the court room.

When he entered alone the judge enquired where the prisoner was. Hawkins replied courteously that he was not the prisoner’s keeper and finally said that. The judge hurried officers after him but he was free. Another law suit which is still told of by the old citizens was one in which Ira Brayton was defendant. He had become indebted to one of the early pioneers in the sum of twenty dollars and had given a mortgage on three fine yokes of cattle worth several times that amount, but was not able to raise the money and his creditor expected to take the cattle.

So sure was he of securing them that he solicited jobs of “breaking up” new land expecting to do the work with these cattle. Ezra Frisbee finally decided to help Mr. Brayton out. Constable Durfee who was long remembered because he always went barefooted, was the officer in the case and learned of Mr. Frisbee’s intentions. As soon as the bidding reached the amount of the debt and costs, he struck the cattle off to Mr. Frisbee who left them with Mr. In his efforts to save himself Mr.

Brayton had acquired a judgement which another man held against his creditor, and had placed this with Constable Durfee for collection. As soon as Mr. Frisbee placed the money on a table to pay for the cattle the constable levied upon enough to satisfy this judgment and the grinding creditor got out of the whole transaction considerably in the hole. While most of the pioneers made the best of things and put up with privations, there were those who missed the luxuries of the outside world.

Among these was a man named Betts who settled in the north. He came from New York and was always lamenting the fact that he could not enjoy what his neighbors put up with. One morning it was found that he had taken poison and was dead. This was the first experience of this character and was quite a shock for the pioneer settlers. Gardner Wheeler’s location in Howell as the first physician here was noted in a previous chapter. He was followed in , by Dr, Charles A. Jeffries who remained here until when he moved to Washtenaw county.

William Huntington succeeded to his practice when he left Howell and remained here until his death. His son Dr. Huntington practiced with his father for many years and succeeded to the extensive practice which he built.

Nichols Hard located here in and remained for two years. Olds moved here in but never practiced a great deal. He was a fine penman and taught writing school while here. William Dowlman came here from England in , but never practiced a great deal.

He was a Methodist local preacher and did considerable work in that line in the western part of the county. He served as regular pastor at Stevenson in the upper peninsula in the latter ’70s and as far as known never came back here.

Thomas R. Spence located in Howell in and had an extensive practice for about six years, when he moved to Detroit. Page [unnumbered] i. Wells settled in Howell in and enjoyed a very extensive practice for the rest of his life. Attorney Wellington A Glover, Howell’s first lawyer, was about two years alone in his profession here and then Josiah W, Turner came in Soon after settling here Judge Turner was appointed master in chancery.

He also became deputy ounty clerk under Jesse Mapes who held the office at that time, and did the work of the office. Mapes re signed in Februrary, , and the young lawyer was appointed to the position.

That coming fall he was elected to the office and again in In November , he was elected county judge and re-elected in In he was elected Judge of Probate. In May, he was appointed, Judge of the Supreme Court. In the November election of that year he was elected Circuit Judge to which he was re-elected three times. In Judge Turner moved to Owosso, to be nearer the center of his circuit. He continued to make that his home until his death in In his early years in Howell, he attended to the duties of his official positions, engaged in other lines of business, and built up a nice law practice.

Soon after coming here he built the office building just south of the city building, and a residence on the lot now vacant, opposite Fishbeck. He afterward built the house at the corner of Fleming and Hubbell streets, now occupied by R. Reed, which was his home for a good many years. Fredrick C. Whipple who settled, in Brighton in and was the founder of the Livingston Courier, moved to Howell with the paper, in and practiced law here for twenty-two years. He was a brilliant lawyer and was recognized as a leading jury lawyer of the state.

Lauren K. Hewett settled here in and practiced law for about fifteen years. His brother Lewis H. Hewett was associated with him here for some years. Richard B. Hall practiced law here from to He afterwards went to California where he became a detective of some considerable note. James H. Ackerson became a lawyer here in His practice has the reputation of sharp dodging rather than profound law. A story is told that he was employed to defend a man who was guilty of larceny.

Ackerson saw defects in the papers and arranged with his man to break them and then run him off while they were drawing new ones. For this purpose he rode one horse and led another when he went out to the country justice’s for the examination. The scheme worked and the prisoner got safely away on the extra horse. THe moved to Sagina w in While he,’re on a visit and business trip sometime later, he was taken suddenly sick and died. His widow who is remembered here as a, moest eccettric character, never admits anyone insidi.

Practically all her connection with the outside world is done with; her telephone.. Charles C, Ellsworth, first landlord of Gay’s temperance hotel, studied law with Judge Turner and was adimnitted to the bar here in He seirved that district in Congress with some little distinction.

In the early ’60 s he moved to Saginaw. As noted previously Rev. Edward E. Gregory settled in Howell in He lived for some time in. Henrv Root’s unfinished house and as ]e used 1to say, “Cooked by a stump in the st. In he became pastor of the- Presbyterian church here and served faithfully in that position for two years. With the exception of a short time in 0wosso, Mr. Gregory continued to reside in Howell until, his dloath in He was of a quiet and unasuming nalure but of sterling Christian character.

His name was associated with all the organizations for moral uplift in the early days of this community. Skilbeek opened a shoe shop in Howell about As unemployment remains high across New Jersey, many local companies are still hiring.

The home has been completely redone on the inside. Take a look and tell us what you think. Two people in the car were injured. Thunderstorms, damaging winds and flash flooding are slated for the Garden State on Tuesday. Looking to scope out the market? Check out what the latest homes in Toms River have to offer. The state Department of Transportation said the repair work is estimated to take about two weeks. Email Address. Phone Number.

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This consent applies even if you are on a do not call list and is not a condition of any purchase. Active Residential Inventory. Recently Sold Properties. Total Sales Last 6 Months. Foreclosures Pre-foreclosures Bank Owned 0. Auctions For Sale Nearby Recently Sold Homes. Recently Sold. Nearby Cities 1. Howell, NJ. Farmingdale, NJ. Allenwood, NJ.

 
 

4 hazelwood court howell nj free

 

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You can get even more specific with keyword search. Want to picture your life in West Bend? While not in this township, Wm. Rumsey’s saw mill in Oceola, furnished so much of the lumber in Howell buildings that it should be noticed. There has been considerable change too in the topo. Jewett remembers sneaking around a pond for ducks, about where William Whitacre is now building a home, and many of the boys and girls of other days remember a favorite place to slide down hill a little ways this side of the P.

In these early days pigeons were so thick that it was no fun to hunt them. A big tree which stands in Mrs. Dollie Butler’s yard was one of their favorite haunts. If anyone wanted a mess of pigeons to eat they would go over there and shoot what they wanted and leave the rest There are so many things of interest for this period of our history that we are loth to leave them.

It would be wrong however for us to pass to a new period without a word of that sturdy class who settled here to create homes, the real foundation of any good civilization, but who, while backing every worthy enterprise, were more quiet in their way of doing things.

Two representatives of this class will always be remembered for their honesty of purpose and solid worth They were Rev. Gregory and William Smith. By the harvest of sufficient land had been put to crops to secure enough and to spare and the ingathering that season marked an advance of no little importance.

Hotels and Fun In his first address to the county pioneer society Judge Turner discussed the first settlers in a social way, He could not remember any extensive colonization but said that “there were to be found among the early settlers men from Ireland, Scotland, England Wales, New England, New York, Ohio and the Canadas, They had never seen or heard of each other before.

This sort of mixed settlement was as pleasant as any. The mormon is doomed to see the hated gentile climb his fence ere it is scarcely built. The most carefully consorted communities can scarcely preserve their exclusiveness for an hour, I conclude therefore that Livingston county made as much progress and had realy as much amusement as any other.

Jerome W. Turner once said: “Howell was a town from the start with a grin on its conntennuce, which never relaxed but continually flowed into guffaws. Shope the tract east of the village on the Grand River road as it was by this time called, about where it is crossed by the Ann Arbor railway. On this land there. To this hotel and its proprietor is largely due the reputation for fun which Howell soon gained abroad.

In an impromptu address to the pioneer society in Judge Turner told this story: In these early days court week was the great occasion of the new county Everybody was at court. The crowd that gathered at Sliter’s at such time was far beyond all his limited sleeping accomodations. His bar room floor was literally covered with jurors and witnesses during the nights.

One night when the floor was about as densely populated as it could be with sleepers two lawyers named George Danforth and Olney Hawkins from Ann Arbor, crawled out the back way, and by inducements in the shape of Indian corn, succeeded in calling two large hogs to the bar room door and getting them inside.

Then they started a bulldog Slitter owned after the hogs and quietly but swiftly retired to their beds in a rear passage.

If Slitter’s dog ever had any failings they could not be urged against his persistency as a biter, The scene that followed would baffle discription. The squealing of a captured hog is always very thrilling but when dinned into the ears of sleeping men at the dead of night, and it is accompanied by vicious kicks and thumps on their bodies it is alarming. We quote from Judge Turner and his son above quoted. One man I know, who resided in the city of New York, who has since told me that he was accustomed to travel through almost every town in the United States large enough to hold a meeting house without finding one that could equal Howell for fun.

There was an abandonment about it, too, that gave it zest; men laughed in hearty deep-chested tones here in the back woods, and assembled to see the perpetration of a practical joke in more numerical strength than they did at a funeral. Nobody was in a hurry, no one was careful or troubled about many things; we had actors and an audience.

Men forsook what little business they had for simple sport. One man I knew-Elijah Coffren, a carpenter and joiner by trade,-who would come down from the roof of a promising job to join in a little hilarity, and not be able to get away from it so that he could return in a month.

The super-urgent business was fun; that was a complete plea to any declaration for damages on account of any delay in work. Even shows which were supposed to carry about with them a sort of stereotyped humor which can make an hour passable, were tame concerns here in those early days and it was two to one that some. Subjects of mesmerism underwent copious inundations of cold water; the magic lantern cuirass suddenly grew cloudy with ink, and the return of pewter and tin sixpences astonished the showman when he counted up after the performance.

Apropos of this there were at an early day, organized in Howell, companies of squirters who were armed with pint and quart squiit guns with which they deluged all bibulous individuals. A man could get on a drunk in the daytime but he had need to watch the sun very closely and not be seen around after nightfall. He was emphatically an ugly customer and he asserted in all sorts of forcible inelegance, that ‘the first man who squirts any water onto me’ll get his head knocked off.

Boy as I was I had read the story of Goliath of Gath, and when I saw a single person, a stripling in size emerge from a building on the street with a quart squirt gun at ‘present arms’ and advance. I do not know that I was certain then or that I am entirely positive now, who the lad was who went out against him, but he had a wonderful similarity to one Leander Smith, who once lived in Howell, so similar as to puzzle people as to the question of identity.

A fine stream from the youth’s gun struck Bristol fair and square in the eyes! Bristol plunged down like a kingfisher, and whirled himself along in knots and spirals through the dirt of the street uttering the most abominable yells that ever issued from human lips. He did not seem to know where he was going or to have the least care. He burst through the front door of Elisha Hazard’s grocery, knocking over a counter and roaring like a bull of Bashan!

Well, whisky and pepper-sauce in equal parts is not a very pleasant eye lotion, and Bristol’s visits to Howell became more and more infrequent and of a less turbulent character. There the people gathered and there they brought out their jewels, like the toads, after dark.

These jewels served our purpose then, let us hope that they may not be entirely unregarded now. One evening they were engaged in this pastime in a hotel kept by George Curtis in this place, and an elderly stranger, who happened to be present thinking it to be an imposition on the old man, strongly remonstrated with the boys against what he termed ‘ such shameful conduct. It wasn’t a great while before they had use for their cage.

After awhile he tired of it and wanted to get out but the old crate was fixed up too strong and it was half a day or more before he was released. About the land was full of prospectors and adventurers and these numerous hotels did a much larger. Although Sliter’s was some distance from town and a long stretch of corduroy road lay between the village. It came to be understood however that the man who stopped there must expect to become the victim of some joke before he left and few got away without an experience more or less funny.

Sliter afterwards settled in Deerfield where his wife died. After that he went to Kent county and started another hotel but lost it in a trade for land which only existed in the mind of the speculator who beat him out of his property.

Allen C. Weston started some kind of a stage line between Howell and Detroit, in and in began the erection of a hotel. Before it wvas finished his eyesight failed and he traded the property and stage line to Benjamine Spring for land on section Spring completed the hotel and built a new stage which was probably as odd as the odd character who ran the line.

It was painted red and named the “Red Bird. Spring wvas a worthy contemporary of Sliter. It is said that he had a boarder who was more prompt to meals than he was to pay his bill. Spring met him at the dining room door as he wvas coming out with several boarders one day, and handing him some. Spring was a great admirer of General Cass. The old vetran stopped at his hotel when campaigning here and Spring went into the dining room himself to see that his noted guest was properly cared for.

Judge of his consternation when he saw the general pu. But Spring was not to be daunted and called out to his wife, in a voice which could be heard all over the room, telling her to go over to Gay’s store and see if she couldn’t find some butter in which the hairs were better rotted. One summer night in , when a party of men were busy with cards at Spring’s hotel their bottle was left so near the window that some boys reached in and stole it.

The effect upon them was as a live coal which had roused Edward F, Gay who had dedecided to try and better the condition by building a temperance hotel. Accordingly he talked the matter over with his neighbors and decided to buy the lot where the Goodnow block now stands, at the corner of Grand River and Division streets. Unfortunately he told some of his neighbors of this decision and the opposition attemped to head off his temperance movement. Hezekiah Gates hurried off to Detroit the day before Gay was to go, and bought the lot.

As soon as. This hotel was the first brick building in Howell and the first temperance hotel for miles around. The brick for its erection were burned on Mr. Gay’s own farm in Marion, now occupied dy Eastman’s dairy farm, Z. Drew furnished the lime from a kiln he had established near the Marion town line. Ellsworth afterwards a prominent lawyer here, was the first landlord. Ellsworth surely was Daniel like for he opened the hotel with a flag flying to the breeze upon which was inscribed “Liberty and Temperance.

Gay kept the hotel for many years and then sold it; It was purchased after a while by Mr. Pebbles and its name changed to Livingston Hotel. It remained a temperance hotel until torn down when John Weimeister built the present block in Superstitious ones were not at all surprised at. The building of his hotel proved too great a project for his financial resources. Before its completion he was obliged to go into bankruptey. Shaft’s hotel which was built a little later than the others mentioned, really belonged to this period.

It’s first owner was Williamu C. Shaft who was Spring’s opposition in the stage business to Detroit. It changed hands several timies until , when it was purchased by Benjamine H. Rubert who added a third story and ran the house successfully until his death. His son Seth B.

Rubert ran the house a number of years. It has changed hands two or three times since Mr. Rubert died but still bears his name.

Not All Fun In the Legislature created a board of county commissioners. But little is left of their records. Emery Beal, Charles P. Bush and Orman Holmes constituted the board. The County Commissioners ceased to have authority after the Legislature of and the board of supervisors was reorganized.

It has met regularly ever since that time. Judge Kingsley S. Bingham the first Probate Judge of this county, had no official business to perform. His office was at his residence in Green Oak. The next, Judge James W. Stanbury, lived in Pinckney and held his court there. The first will he admitted to probate was that of James Sage, the first white settler of Howell, who died June 29, His will was dated January 15 of that year and was officially witnessed by Dr.

Wellington A. Glover and wife and 0. Sage’s son-in-law, Joseph H. The legatees were Mrs. Sage widow of the deceased, and her children, George T. Sage, James R. Sage, Chester A. Sage, Mary A. Pinckney and Hannah A. The date of record is quite badly faded but it was sometime in July, Kneeland who was elected in , moved the office to Howell.

His first business was on February 8, , when letters of administration were granted in the estate of Josiah P. The Presbyterian society held most of its meetings in the village school house, as did both the other denominations, until the year , In the society began the erection of a church building which was completed the following year.

This church originally stood a little north of the Central School Hous square and fronted to the south, amidst what was then a growth of underbrush. The site proved to be a bad one as in muddy weather, the church was almost inaccessible, and it was moved to nearly the present site of the Knapp shops. Sometime afterward the society became involved by too extensive repairs to the building and it was sold at forced sale, to the highest bidder.

It was afterwards moved to Division street and occupied by Staley’s wagon shop for a good many years. Its old ruins, about twenty feet from the first school house, still remain. When the church was first organized it adopted the union plan but on September 21, , by resolution it became Presbyterian and remained so until July 29, when it changed to Congregational, but returned to Presbyterian October 27, and has been in that connection since that date. As before referred to there was a determined effort made to move the county site to Brighton and the.

B Crane and others. This agitation however had the effect to defeat all projects to build sutiable buildings when presented to the people as heretofore detailed in these pages. The earliest officers who had office in Howell, all made their offices at the Eagle Tavern.

Crane built a one story building of two rooms near the site of Mrs. Amos T. Slader’s present residence, in and the county offices were soon moved to it, the building being rented by the county. It was aftcrwards purchased as will be noted further on. In , the board of supervisors contracted with Benjamin Spring, for the use of his ball room in his hotel in which to hold conrt.

This arrangement only lasted for a slort time and the Presbyterian church was leased for holding court and all coun-ty tumeetings. The Tental was twenty five dollars per teram of court for a time, and later, forty dollars per year, for all county purposes. This latter arranguemennt continued for about three years, until what is now known as the old court house, was completed In the spring of , a vote was taken at each town moeting, to build a court house and jail, and the board of Supervisors elected a building committee who advertised for the recieval of plans and spe-ifications.

By the time the board met in October of that year, they had taken legal counsel and decided that tl. In the following year the Legislature passed an enabling act and the board at a special meeting in June, , arralnged for the building of the old court house. After sonme delay, the contract was let to Emos B. Taylor whe completed the building late in the fall of By a resolution of the Board, the belfry was erected upon condition that the people of Howell should raise a suitable sum to purchase a bell.

When the old court house was torn down, the bell was saved by Fishbeck Brothers and others. It has since been properly mounted and stands just inside the bar railing in the circuit court room. When it came to building the court house, the location became an iniportant issue. No one had cared particularly where the commissioners should locate the county site except that it should be in Howell but when the buildings were to be commenced that was another question and especially so to Peter Cowdry and Edward Thompson who had platted additions to the village and were sure that if they could get the buildings located upon their land it would prove a boom to their additions.

After a proper effort they succeeded in so doing and the connty site was changed from the old public square south of Grand River street and west of Walnut street, to its present location, the front part of the present square being donated to the county by M. Cowdry and the north half by Mr. The lots of the origrinal portion of town had many of them been purchased by speculators who were non residents and this fact, with the moving of the county site, had much to do with changinz the.

With the procuring of the new site, the old county office building was moved to the new square in a position about midway between the present front of the court house and the west side of the square.

When the, brick office building was erected on that site it was moved to the north side of the square and was later sold to William B.

Smith who moved it a block east, on the south side of Grand River street west of Bernard street, where it became part of the residence recently purchased by Oscar Hesse. It has been rebuilt several times. Immediately after the court house was finished the board of supervisors passed a resolution to allow all religious denominations to hold services there and the proposition was accepted by all but the Presbyterians who already had their chureh built. The jail and sheriff’s residence occupied the ground floor of the old court house and the court and jury rooms the second story.

In a contract was let to George W. Lee to build an office building west of the court house, on the site occupied by the wooden office building. This building was completed that year and. Rubert’s lumber and coal yard is now located. About this time or a little before, the village acquired its first resident pastor. Henry Root who had been employed by the Presbyterian church, moved to Howell as its pioneer in that profession. The people of this county were of a literary taste and in organized a Union Lyceum which became very popular in those early days.

About this time the Fleming post office was established. Smith was its first postmaster and the office was located in his residence which stood nearly opposite to the present farm residence of Frank Hecox, on the Grand River road. It was afterwards moved to six corners where it was maintained until some time after free rural delivery was established.

The Marr buring ground was also established in the early ’40s. The old general training days were seasons of revelry more or less important from the first, but their amount in this county were of a comparatively small importance before , As far back as the days of Amos Adams there were some things accomplished in this line and that gentleman painted a flag for use on these occasions, which is still in existence, a treasured relic in the home of George W.

In a regiment was organized in this county with Col. Timothy R. Allison of Pinckney, in command. By an order dated Feb. The company from this beat was comparatively well organized with Ralph Fowler of Fowlerville, as captain. The troops were mustered in on old public square, but a portion of the forty sold to M. Crittenden soon after her husband’s death was prepared for training purposes.

The general poor success of trainings of this character, to secure the desired results, caused the repeal of the law soon after the above date and ended all extensive efforts of that character in Howell. The early pioneers were patriots as strong as many who have come after them. The first Fourth of July celebration in this city was held under temperance auspices, in , in the grove where the Presbyterian church now stands. No attempt was made at fireworks or other evening demonstration.

Manufacturing in a pioneer way, took quite a boom about this time. Andrew L. Hill opened a wagon shop in Hill made the first cutter in town for Philander Glover. It was afterwards purchased by Judge Turner who located here in In W. K, Melvin and James Lawther opened the “Areade shops” and put up the building which years after, was built over into the Commercial Hotel.

In , Hickey and Galloway erected a foundry on the site ofMrs, L. Cook’s residence south of the tunnel. They not only manufactured all kinds of agricultural implements, but all kinds of stoves, kettles, etc.

The shops were successively owned by. Archer and lastly by Abigal W. Smith and Dexter Filkins, They were burned while the latter gentlemen owned them. Marsh settled here in The shores of time in this vicinity are lined with wrecks of select schools and other private educational institutions. The earliest of these was by Theodore Bridgeman who opened his Howell Select School in , in the old Presbyterian church. The school lived only a little while and died in time to make room for the Clasical Select School which was started in December of that year by Rev.

McEwen, but this ent erprise soon kept company with its predecessor. M’ariah L. Charles was the next and her select school was quite an institution in the summer of The Howell Academy was opened April 1, , and premised to be quite an institution but the promises were never realized.

Whipple, Elijah F. Lee, John Kenyon Jr. This firm never did anything beyond the procurement of its charter. The old frame school house proved entirely inadequate for the growth of the town and early in the forties agitation for a new one began to grow. An appropriation for a new building was made in , but was reconsidered. A fight between sections north and south of Grand River street was fully developed.

The north side was never strong enough to secure the location although they managed to secure south-siders enough to change every location decided upon from to , and kept the ball rolliDg from the old public square, the present site of the M. Church, and others, until its final location on the present site of the central scoool building, December 15, The question of location would no doubt have continued much longer had not a resolution been passed in September, , instructing the district board to sell the school house which they did and rented rooms in the Stage House for school purposes, John Dickson being employed to teach there.

Willis Wills was tho first teacher in the new building, In , a dissolution arose in the Presbyterian church and Charles Clark, Mrs. Mariah Clark, Zebulon M. Drew, Edward F. Gay, Mrs. Clarssa L. Gay, Benjamine W. Cardell and wife drew out of that church and organized a Congregational church. The Bible society was organized in and did considerable work until A new society was organized in which has been allowed to lapse al.

Pettibone Esq. About this time the prevailing epidemic of fun making took a setback. The wife of a blacksmith named Rorabacher died. Her bereaved husband failed to wait a sufficient time after her funeral, to suit his neighbors ideas of propriety, before he married his second wife. One result of this condition of affairs was the arrangement for a regular old fashioned horning.

The late Dr. Huntington who was always ready for fun was solicited to captain the horning party but he declined the honor and decided to present a counter attraction. Accordingly he arranged with a couple of confederates and the three crawled up near Rorabacher’s house unobserved by its occupants who were all unconscions of what awaited them.

In time the horning party arrived, led by Benjamin Spring who was literally covered with sleighbells. As he approached at the head of his crowd, the doctor and his party opened upon them with double barrelled shot guns.

Spring cut and run, nor would he go back. Some little noise was started however, but word came from the house that the bride 14ad been scared into hysterics and the doctor had a patient on his hands. It took very little coaxing to send the crowd away for the joke was so badly on Spring because of his scare, that everyone pulled him back to his hotel to liquor up at his expense.

There were great tracts of land all around, which were unfenced and cattle were allowed to run at large during the days. Occasionally one would come up missing and the theory usually was that it had wandered into some of the marshes and mired out of sight. Johnathan Austin lost a cow and after awhile, gave it up as lost. Some months later a neighbor told him that he had seen his cow pasturing on the public square.

Austin went to the square and finding a cow which looked Jike his, drove her home. Then Z. M, Drew’s cow was reported lost. In time it was reported to Mr. Drew that Johnathan Austin had his cow and he went to claim it.

Both men were sure the cow was theirs and a law suit was the result. Both were leading members of the Presbyterian church and there was quite a little row kicked up in church circles over the matter. The trial created no end of interest. Both sides presented leading citizens who positively identified the cow and everything looked like an even strength for both sides of the case.

Shortly before time for adjournment for supper, Dr. Huntington who was one of the jurors casually asked witnesses on both sides as to the milking qualities. Austin’s witnesses agreed that his cow was a hard milker, while Drew’s witnesses testified that his cow was a very. The case went to the jury in the evening and they returned a verdict in a few minutes, unanimous for Drew. During the intermission the doctor quietly went and milked the cow.

As soon as they reached the jury room he told his companions what he had done. The fact that she was an easy milker settled the case. In those early days however, it didn’t settle the row. Another case about that time will remain a standing joke of the county as long as the pioneers remain. A man had been arrested for stealing and was taken into Circuit Court where he stated that he had no money and Attorney Hawkins was appointed to defend him, 11r.

He is said to have asked the fellow if he was guilty and was answered that he was. To his enquiry as to whether they could prove it his client said that he guessed that they could for they found the stolen property with him. Hawkins asked him how much money he had and took half of it.

He then pointed to a window and told the prisoner to “git. After awhile the sheriff hunted him up and told him the judge wanted to see him, Hawkins is said to have sauntered leisurely into the court room. When he entered alone the judge enquired where the prisoner was. Hawkins replied courteously that he was not the prisoner’s keeper and finally said that. The judge hurried officers after him but he was free. Another law suit which is still told of by the old citizens was one in which Ira Brayton was defendant.

He had become indebted to one of the early pioneers in the sum of twenty dollars and had given a mortgage on three fine yokes of cattle worth several times that amount, but was not able to raise the money and his creditor expected to take the cattle. So sure was he of securing them that he solicited jobs of “breaking up” new land expecting to do the work with these cattle. Ezra Frisbee finally decided to help Mr.

Brayton out. Constable Durfee who was long remembered because he always went barefooted, was the officer in the case and learned of Mr. Frisbee’s intentions. As soon as the bidding reached the amount of the debt and costs, he struck the cattle off to Mr. Frisbee who left them with Mr. In his efforts to save himself Mr. Brayton had acquired a judgement which another man held against his creditor, and had placed this with Constable Durfee for collection.

As soon as Mr. Frisbee placed the money on a table to pay for the cattle the constable levied upon enough to satisfy this judgment and the grinding creditor got out of the whole transaction considerably in the hole. While most of the pioneers made the best of things and put up with privations, there were those who missed the luxuries of the outside world.

Among these was a man named Betts who settled in the north. He came from New York and was always lamenting the fact that he could not enjoy what his neighbors put up with. One morning it was found that he had taken poison and was dead. This was the first experience of this character and was quite a shock for the pioneer settlers. Gardner Wheeler’s location in Howell as the first physician here was noted in a previous chapter. He was followed in , by Dr, Charles A. Jeffries who remained here until when he moved to Washtenaw county.

William Huntington succeeded to his practice when he left Howell and remained here until his death. His son Dr. Huntington practiced with his father for many years and succeeded to the extensive practice which he built. Nichols Hard located here in and remained for two years. Olds moved here in but never practiced a great deal. He was a fine penman and taught writing school while here. William Dowlman came here from England in , but never practiced a great deal.

He was a Methodist local preacher and did considerable work in that line in the western part of the county. He served as regular pastor at Stevenson in the upper peninsula in the latter ’70s and as far as known never came back here. Thomas R. Spence located in Howell in and had an extensive practice for about six years, when he moved to Detroit. Page [unnumbered] i. Wells settled in Howell in and enjoyed a very extensive practice for the rest of his life.

Attorney Wellington A Glover, Howell’s first lawyer, was about two years alone in his profession here and then Josiah W, Turner came in Soon after settling here Judge Turner was appointed master in chancery. He also became deputy ounty clerk under Jesse Mapes who held the office at that time, and did the work of the office. Mapes re signed in Februrary, , and the young lawyer was appointed to the position. That coming fall he was elected to the office and again in In November , he was elected county judge and re-elected in In he was elected Judge of Probate.

In May, he was appointed, Judge of the Supreme Court. In the November election of that year he was elected Circuit Judge to which he was re-elected three times. In Judge Turner moved to Owosso, to be nearer the center of his circuit.

He continued to make that his home until his death in In his early years in Howell, he attended to the duties of his official positions, engaged in other lines of business, and built up a nice law practice. Soon after coming here he built the office building just south of the city building, and a residence on the lot now vacant, opposite Fishbeck. He afterward built the house at the corner of Fleming and Hubbell streets, now occupied by R.

Reed, which was his home for a good many years. Fredrick C. Whipple who settled, in Brighton in and was the founder of the Livingston Courier, moved to Howell with the paper, in and practiced law here for twenty-two years.

He was a brilliant lawyer and was recognized as a leading jury lawyer of the state. Lauren K. Hewett settled here in and practiced law for about fifteen years. His brother Lewis H. Hewett was associated with him here for some years. Richard B. Hall practiced law here from to He afterwards went to California where he became a detective of some considerable note. James H. Ackerson became a lawyer here in His practice has the reputation of sharp dodging rather than profound law.

A story is told that he was employed to defend a man who was guilty of larceny. Ackerson saw defects in the papers and arranged with his man to break them and then run him off while they were drawing new ones. For this purpose he rode one horse and led another when he went out to the country justice’s for the examination. The scheme worked and the prisoner got safely away on the extra horse. THe moved to Sagina w in While he,’re on a visit and business trip sometime later, he was taken suddenly sick and died.

His widow who is remembered here as a, moest eccettric character, never admits anyone insidi. Practically all her connection with the outside world is done with; her telephone.. Charles C, Ellsworth, first landlord of Gay’s temperance hotel, studied law with Judge Turner and was adimnitted to the bar here in He seirved that district in Congress with some little distinction.

In the early ’60 s he moved to Saginaw. As noted previously Rev. Edward E. Gregory settled in Howell in He lived for some time in. Henrv Root’s unfinished house and as ]e used 1to say, “Cooked by a stump in the st.

In he became pastor of the- Presbyterian church here and served faithfully in that position for two years. With the exception of a short time in 0wosso, Mr. Gregory continued to reside in Howell until, his dloath in He was of a quiet and unasuming nalure but of sterling Christian character.

His name was associated with all the organizations for moral uplift in the early days of this community. Skilbeek opened a shoe shop in Howell about John R. Neely camiee heie about the same time as Mr. He was a mason by trade, the pioneer. Several of the older buildings are monuments of his labor.

Joseph Rowe the pioneer tailor was another to arrive about that time. The Livingston Courier, a five column folio paper, was the first published in the county. Its first issue was at Brighton on Janiuary 10, Nicholas Sullivan was its first publisher and Frederick C. Whipple was its first editor. Early in October, , it was moved to Howell by its publisher and Lewis H.

H1iewett was em’plroyed as editor. Its first issue in. About three years ofter moving to Hlowell, MAr. Sullivan sold the Courier to E, R.

Powell and it was afterwards owned by William8 B. Smith and Aeorge V. Under Mr. Root’s management the paper died in R, Powell editor and proprietor. Terms: One dollar and fifty cents per anum in advancee otherwise two dollars will be required in every case. Hewett, Prosecuting Attorney. Hall, Notary Public. Office opposite the Public Square, Howell. Marsh, M.

Shop one door east of the Livingston Hotel. Sullivan, Howell, Livingston County, Michigan. Smith, Howell, Mich. The undersigned having formed a partnership for the purpose of practicing the above profession, will be ready at all times, unless engaged in professional business to attend such as may require their services.

Gardner Wheeler. Ilewett, wheat buyer. The only item of local news in the whole paper read as follows: “Going Ahead. Our village is progressing with rapid strides; building after building is arising on either hand, while the hand-saw and hammer of the carpenters almost deafen one. Tearing down, drawing off and rebuilding, is the order of the day. Onward is the march of empire..

We are creditably informed that the entire stock of the Plank road from Detroit through this place to the capitol, will soon be taken and finished to this place. We opine such good luck for the present. For Early Tra ‘vXe. Indian trails were the first r’-,ads in this section. They formed the highways over which the pioneers came to their wilderness homes. Occasionally thel wa1gonIs would,.

A grant of five thousand acres of land was also secured for the 4raund river and Sagi-naw roads, of whilch our road received its share. While the work thus provided for was in progress Michigan became a state. Soon after. Judge Turner. The road, which he found opened to Brighton, was gradually worked through Howell, and nearly to Fo-wlerville, largely by his efforts for state appropriatio’nzs and other ways of securing funds for that purpose.

This nppropriation was increased by the addition of “non resident taxes” for all land within two miles of the road along the line of the improvement. With the aid of a large number of private subscriptions which were secured, this appropriation added to what had gone before, put the road west of Howell in fairly good condition. Before this time the stage lines heretofore mentioned, were doing a.

About or ’43, Ralph Fowler who had become very much interested in the road west of town because of his connection with it as commissioner, and C. Williams of Williainston, put a line of lumber wagons to running between Howell and Lansing, whic.

Acts were passed for state roads everywhere where any one suggested them. If a very small percentage of those provided for had come to be roads, the pioneers would have vied with present day tax conditions. Among those which would have come to Howell was a road from Allegan to Hastings, to Charlotte, to Mason, to Howell, to intersect with the Grand River road here.

Crane of flowell, was one of its commissioners. The next Legislature seems to have insisted that something be done for this road for another act was passed for the same line.

Guy C. Lee was named as commissioner in this act in place of Mr. In the same line was again provided for except that in describing it, the line was reversed, the description commencing at Howell.

George W. Jewett was one of the commissioners named in this act. It seems to have been a case of three times and out however, for the road was never built. In an act was passed providing for a state road from Milford to Howell out it was never opened, While the proposed line failed to touch Howell the canal fever which swept through this section about should be noted in this connection.

Three lines were proposed which touched the county, The one which promised most was to commence at Mt,. It crossed Crooked lake in this county. A branch canal was promoted from Crooked lake along the Huron river to Dexter, and a company was chartered for its construction. As late as the agitation for these water routes had life but they too died in the paper stages of the enterprise. In a rail road project was started but farmers all along the line strongly opposed it on the ground that it would injure their teaming trade and make it unprofitable for them to keep so many horses, thus forcing them back to oxen for their farm work.

Partially as an outgrowth of this rail road agitation there grew up a sentiment for a plank road which materialized the next year when the Legislature passed an act appointing Charles P. In another plank road enterprise was started.

Dennis, F. Prevost and Noah Ramsdell were appointed commissioners by act of the Legislature, to solicit stock for the building of a plank road from Howell to. Page 79 H. The next year the act was amended by jmaking Nathaniel Turner and Harvey T. Lee cimmissioners in place of B. Dennis and F.

Lee, president, Josiah Turner secretary and treasurer. April 3, , a company was incorporated with a capital stock of one-hundred and twenty-five thousand dollars, to build a plank road from Detroit to Howell, also from a point on this road to Waterford, also from some other point on the line, to Milford. The,company was empowered to increase its stock twentyfive -thousand dollars at some future time, and thejn to extend its main line from Hlowell to “the village of Michingaa,” now Lansing.

A commission was selected to solicit stock, as follows:- tHenry Ledyard and A. Bagg of Detroit, Joseph M. Mead of Plymouth, Augustus C. Baldwin of Milford, and Josiah Turner of Howell. Trowbridge of Detroit, became president of the company and Henry Ledyard, also of Detroit, secretaryv and treasurer.

The commission made a vigerous canvass and soon had enough money to warant commencing work. During the year the plank was laid to Howell and the great enterprise be.

The financial success of the Detroit and Howell road was assured long before the planks were all laid, This caused the organization of another company which secured its incorporation in the spring of James Seymour, Hiram H. Smith, Ephraim B. Lee and Frederick C. Whipple were the commission to solicit sixty thousand dollars of stock. Their company was given the Grand River road from Lansing to Howell. They had raised enough to commence work by that fall and two years later, had the road completed.

In these days it is hard to grasp the value of such a road to the developemenat of all this part of Michigan. It opened the way for the hundreds of teams which daily passed over it. The old stages which were little more than lumbor wagons, gave place to four horse vehicles which carried from twelve to twenty persons each.

When the planks wore out and rotted away the company filled the gaps with gravel which became more and more substantial until the early “70s when public sentiment against the tollgates became so great that everyone could see that they were not to stand much lounger. The companies took off their repair forces and allowed the ‘road to run down gradnally, until the people would stand it ino longer, and in they ceased to collect toll here.

They hung on in other parts of the line until some years later, The old tollgate houses were moved back and sold. Charters of the companies provided for gates every five miles. As Howell was the end of both roads, each company maintained a gate here the one just in the east rn part of town and the other at the brow of the hill just west of the village.

This arrangement made it impossible for anyone to get in or out of town without paying the cent per mile they traveled on that road, for eaeh horse they drove, It seems a nominal amount but it was a big enterprise in the early day and paid a large income on the investment before the railroad came here.

In this connection it may be well to review the rail road projects and development h ere. A few miles beyond Brighton is a little settlement of very old houses and a one-story brick building.

This old town is Kensington. In the very early days it had a few aggressive men who sought to build a city there. The brick building was their “Wild Cat” bank, It’s failure with the consequent loss to people all through this section, was their death blow. In whatever enterprise their names appeared after that, the people turned against it.

In a rail road was projected from Detroit to Farmington, to Kensington, to Howell, to Byron, to Shiawassee village. It is noticable that the charter provided that the company should not only have the right to propel cars by steam power, but by animals or a combination of any power they should decide upon. The ‘commission to solicit stock for this enterprise had two. Even the names of such thoroughly reliable men as Ely Barnard of Howell, and others along the line who were members of the commission, did not suffice to give the people confidence and they would not take hold.

In , there was another railroad project here. Lee, L. Hewett and E. Burt were the Howell portion of the committee which worked it up. They created quite a sentiment and raised considerable money here. Other paits of the line failed to bring up their portion however and the company I:ever went far enough to even organize. June 17, a meeting was held at New Hudson in response to a sentiment which had long been growing, and the Detroit and Howell Railroad Company was organized.

The board of directors elected at that time contained the names of John H. Galloway, E. Burt, R. Rumsey, Joseph H. Wilcox of Howell. The directors organized by electing Theodatus T. Lyon, president; E. Wilcox, attorney. Hiram Newman, Isaac W. Bush, P. Holdridge, Giles Tucker and J. Swife were appointed a commission to secure the stock. There was a unity of purpose in Howell at that day. Led by William Me Phercon, who was more active in the work and imor ready to sacriffice his time and labor thanf probably VUNy other, the people went after the great projeet they hal undertaken.

This wa the sumi agreed upon when work should begin. It required another year to secure the surveys and preliminary entineering and then grading commeinced. Many will remember that day when the crowd gathered ne ar a low place of ground not far from where the water tank at the Howell station ow stands, b see the first dirt move for the new railroad.

A number Of Hlowell people followed, one after another, It wis, a standing subject for talk that Mr. McPhersmn wheeled his load easier than any other of the older men who tried it. Some stock subscriptions failed to rmaterialize but the company pushed on with all the money it could secure. They had accomplished enough however to insure thei building of the road and that was what they wanted. In another. Howell peophl were bendinig all their energies for the Detroit road.

Joreph H. Wilcox was one of its board of directors however. They secured most of the franchises and right of way and had accomplished considerable of the preliminary work when the other company was obliged to suspend its operations. The work accomplished on the Detroit and Howell line had already attracted considerable attention in financial circles.

When the company was obliged to quit, James F. Joy and other Detroit capitalists interested themselves. Learning that all the old company wanted was the construction of the road, they proposed to enter into bonds to do this if the old company would give them what they had, and they eould also acquire the holdings of the Lansing and Howell company.

These terms were accepted. Company, and took up the work under their contract. A newly opened road from Lansing to lonia was also acquired by the company shortly after they commeneed operations. In May, the eastern end was opened to Brighton, and three months later this whole county turned out to a great celebration at Fowlerville, addressed by Dennis Shields of Howell, which celebrated the advent of the iron horse in that village.

 

4 Hazelwood Court, Howell, NJ | MLS | Listing Information | Long & Foster.Local Real Estate: Homes for Sale — West Bend, WI — Coldwell Banker

 

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